– 5.20/ SCHS: Photo of the Week: 250th Anniversary of Suffolk County, 1933 … NEW



SCHS-south-elevation-4979+-79791

SUFFOLK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIEY

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE


If you’ve been enjoying our Photo of the Week, please consider becoming a member of SCHS.

From the Civil War to civil rights, revolutions to restorations, spies to Suffragettes, boatbuilders to bootleggers, and whalers to wineries, Long Island’s history comes alive at the Suffolk County Historical Society!

The Suffolk County Historical Society, founded in 1886, collects and preserves the rich history of Suffolk County and beyond. We offer a history museum, art galleries, a research library and archives, and a multitude of exhibits, programs, and educational lectures and workshops year-round. Our unique collections reflect more than three centuries of Long Island history. Click here to learn about Member Benefits!

——————–

Interested in seeing more historical photos from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society? Spend an afternoon at our Local History Library perusing our extensive archival photography collections. We’re open Weds. – Sat., 12:30 – 4:30 PM.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: May 20, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

250th Anniversary of Suffolk County, Riverhead, 1933

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

250th Anniversary of Suffolk County, Riverhead, 1933. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

In 1933, with almost 18,000 people in attendance for the parade and pageant in downtown Riverhead, the 250th anniversary of the founding of Suffolk County was successful beyond all expectations. The preparations were made by the anniversary committee, headed by former Suffolk County District Attorney George W. Hildreth as chairman, and included a great parade in which all ten towns of the county were represented by elaborately decorated floats. Uniformed military and volunteer firemen, school bands, town officials, Boy and Girl Scouts, and the Suffolk County Historical Society, among others, also participated in the anniversary parade. Marching tunes were played by 14 bands, and 40 fire departments were represented by their members and fire trucks. An old horse-drawn, steam-driven pumper of the Riverhead Fire Dept. occupied a place of honor as it was pulled through the streets, whistle shrieking and black smoke belching from its stack.

The judging committee awarded beautiful silver cups for outstanding floats and other parade entries in various topical categories. Awards for floats that depicted events of historical significance, for instance, went to the Shelter Island Community Club for its Sylvester sisters float, to the United Polish Society of Riverhead for its “Landing of the Puritan Settlers,” and to Congressman Robert Bacon for a “Smithtown Bull Rider” float. Honorable mentions went to Southold for “The First Court House” float and to the Long Island Lighting Company for its portrayal of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Awards for fire departments went to Westhampton Beach Fire Dept. for the most men in line and to Huntington Fire Dept. for most apparatus in line. Southampton won an award for having the largest town representation in the parade.

Suggested Reading: 250th Anniversary of Suffolk County, 1683-1933, Celebration at Riverhead, New York, Souvenir Program, 1933. 

****************************************** 
SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 

_______________________________________________________________

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: May 13, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

American Mother’s Day

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

A Brief History of the American Mother’s Day. (Image from the Postcard Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

Mother’s Day, a holiday honoring motherhood, is observed in different forms throughout the world. In the United States, Mother’s Day is celebrated by presenting mothers and other women with gifts and flowers, and it has become one of the biggest holidays for consumer spending.

The American Mother’s Day was founded by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. However, the origins of Mother’s Day in the United States date back to the nineteenth century. In the years before the Civil War, Anna’s mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia, helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children. These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868, Jarvis organized “Mothers Friendship Day,” when mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragist Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. At times in the 20th century, Mother’s Day has also been a date for launching social causes. In 1968, Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King Jr., used Mother’s Day to host a march in support of underprivileged women and children. In the 1970s, women’s groups used the holiday as a time to highlight the need for equal rights and access to childcare.

The Suffolk County Historical Society
wishes all of our members, friends, and supporters
a very happy Mother’s Day!
****************************************** 
SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 

_______________________________________________________________

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: May 6, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Aquebogue Congregational Church

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

Aquebogue Congregational Church. (Image from the Postcard Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

The Old Steeple Church in Upper Aquebogue was organized in 1768 with just 16 members (11 women and 5 men): Nathaniel Wells, Jonathan Reeve, Deborah Corwin, Richard Howell, Timothy Wells, Anna Moore, Prudence Luce, Hannah Herre, Mary Wells, Eleazer Luce, Mary Wells, Anna Youngs, Mary Youngs, Abiah Sweezy, Sarah Howell, and Abiah Luce.

The original church building was located within the cemetery across the street from the current church structure, offering a convenient way for people coming to church by boat from Riverhead, Flanders, Jamesport, and other locations along Peconic Bay. Many others came to church on horseback or in box wagons drawn by oxen. Most people walked.

Timothy Wells, grandson of Justice Joshua Wells of Southold, was the first pastor of the church. The second minister of the church was Rev. Daniel Youngs. His ministry lasted 32 years, from 1782 to 1814. Rev. Youngs was the great grandson of Southold’s founder, Rev. John Youngs.

The current church building located on the north side of Main Road, was built in the 1860s. A note in the diary of George Henry Tuthill notes: “July 8, 1862. Began building a new church at Upper Aquebogue.” The first couple married in the new church was J. Madison Wells and Catherine Terry in 1863. During the 1938 hurricane, the church steeple was blown down, and funds were raised to construct a new one, which was dedicated in 1939.

Suggested Readings: A History of the Congregational Church in Aquebogue, by Rev. William I. Chalmers, 1910; “A History of Aquebogue Church Buildings,” by Roswell Corwin, 1963

****************************************** 
SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 

_______________________________________________________________

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: April 29, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

U.S. Army Ambulance Service, 1917

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

U.S. Army Ambulance Service, 1917. Daniel Tuthill (1897-1958) of Jamesport (back row, third from left) served with the Ambulance Service during World War I; he was also the first soldier from Suffolk County to receive the French War Cross.  (Image from the World War One Pictorial Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

In April 1917, the United States entered World War I on the side of the Allies (France, Russia, Great Britain, and Italy). The British and French asked for immediate medical support because their medical systems were severely taxed. To meet the needs of war, the U.S. Army’s surgeon general, William M. Gorgas, presided over an enormous expansion of the Army Medical Department. When the United States entered the war, the department consisted of about a thousand personnel, but it numbered over 350,000 when peace returned in November 1918. The Surgeon General’s Office mushroomed from a staff of 153 at the beginning of the war to over 2,100 at its end. The Medical Department was authorized 444 physicians at the beginning of World War I, and had 31,530 when the war ended. Nearly 24 percent of all U.S. physicians served in the Army. Increases in the other specialties were also dramatic. By war’s end the department had 4,620 dentists, 21,480 nurses, and 2,234 veterinarians.

In addition, there were two new precursors of the Medical Service Corps. The U.S. Army Ambulance Service, formed in 1917, had 209 officers, and the Sanitary Corps formed the same year, had 2,919. The department was rounded out with 281,341 enlisted soldiers and 10,695 civilian employees.

Join us today — April 29th — for the opening of our Centennial World War I exhibit, “Over Here, Over There: Long Island and the Great War,” at 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Admission is free, and light refreshments will be served. Arrive on time to see our historical WWI reenactors!

This exhibit will run to January 2018. Exhibit admission is free for all U.S. veterans from April 29 to May 26, 2017.

Over Here, Over There: Long Island & the Great War features artifacts, maps, photographs, weaponry, posters, and more depicting Long Islanders’ experiences during the war…from the front lines to the home front, neutrality to belligerence, and mobilization to victory. Curated by Richard F. Welch. Exhibit design by Richard P. Doctorow. On exhibit through January 2018.

************************************************************


SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: April 22, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Long Island’s Tercentenary–1936 

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-230

Long Island’s Tercentenary, 1936. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

The first European settlement of Long Island (named Lange Eylant by the Dutch) was established at the head of Gowanus Bay, Brooklyn, in 1636, by William Adriaense Bennett and Jacques Bentyn, Dutchmen from New Amsterdam (on the tip of Manhattan Island). Thus, Long Island made claim to its 300th anniversary in 1936.

In commemoration of this historic event, New York Governor Herbert H. Lehman appointed a Long Island Tercentenary Committee to arrange a program in celebration. The U.S. Congress, with the approval of the President, authorized the minting of a special 50-cent coin in honor of Long Island’s Tercentenary. The committee was enlarged to be fully representative of the four Long Island Counties of Kings, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk. County Committees were set up to plan and arrange parades, banquets, pageants, and other forms of local celebrations, beginning on Memorial Day and continuing throughout the summer of 1936. In cooperation with the Long Island Tercentenary Committee, this booklet on “Historic Long Island” was published by the Historical Committee of the Long Island Chamber of Commerce. The booklet is available for reference in our research library.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: April 15, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Flanders, Town of Southampton

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-216

The Road to Flanders, c. 1910. (Image from the Postcard Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

How and when Flanders acquired its present-day name remain a mystery, though it may be that the hamlet adopted the name based on its wetlands and other similarities with the Flanders region of present-day Belgium in Europe. The word “Flanders” is adopted from the Flemish “Vlaanderen,” which means “flooded land.”

It’s believed that Josiah Goodale was the earliest Englishman to permanently settle in the area that would become known as Flanders. Southampton Town records refer to his house at “Aukabog” as early as 1761, and other references indicate that it was likely built prior to 1760. Josiah is credited with clearing much of the land in the hamlet area, and his descendants continue to reside there today. Another early inhabitant was James Fanning II, a Southold native and son of Captain James Fanning, who was a hero of the French Indian War and the first of the Fannings to settle on Long Island. The oldest known surviving house in the hamlet is that of James Benjamin. His homestead, built in circa 1782 and located on Flanders Road, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

To read much more about the history of Flanders, see the Flanders Hamlet Heritage Area Report (2014).

———————————–

The Suffolk County Historical Society is preparing a major exhibit to commemorate the Centennial of World War I. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, April 29, at 1:00 pm, in our Grand Staas Gallery. All are welcome. Admission is free, and light refreshments will be served. Curated by Richard F. Welch, Over Here, Over There: Long Island & the Great Warwill feature artifacts, maps, photographs, weaponry, posters, and more depicting Long Islanders’ experiences during the war…from the front lines to the home front, neutrality to belligerence, and mobilization to victory. We hope you can join us for this special event!

unnamed-217

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: April 8, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

77th Division at Camp Upton

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-198

World War I Centennial: The 77th Division at Camp Upton (Images from the Postcard Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

On April 6, 1917, a hundred years ago almost to the day, the United States formally declared war against Germany and joined the Allied efforts in the First World War, making 1917 one of the most significant years of the twentieth century in redefining the world order. In the spring of 1917, New York state ordered a military census to secure “certain information from the men and women of the State between the ages of 16 and 50 years…[to ensure] the population shall be completely mobilized for war” (see the 1917 “Instructions for Census Agents“).

Draftee Divisions, the 76th through the 93rd, were designated as the National Army. New camps were built to accommodate and train the divisions, one of the largest of them being Camp Upton (today the site of Brookhaven National Lab). But in May 1917, this part of Suffolk County between Calverton and Middle Island was nothing more than a vast stretch of wilderness, scrub oak, and scrub pine. Through the combined efforts of Army men and volunteers, the land was cleared and barracks were erected, enough to accommodate 40,000 troops. By September 1917, Camp Upton would receive its first allotment of draftees from New York City and the surrounding area.

The largest number of troops trained at Camp Upton were the New York draftees known as the 77th Division (bottom postcard image). The first contingent of the 77th left Camp Upton for France in March 1918; under the leadership of General Evan Johnson, the 77th would gain national recognition for its valor at the Argonne Forest in August of that same year. Among the members of the 77th Division was Sergeant Irving Berlin, who while at Camp Upton wrote the military musical “Yip, Yip Yaphank.” A Broadway production would follow with Berlin’s fellow soldiers filling the cast.

————————————-

WORLD WAR 1 CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT

 

The Suffolk County Historical Society is preparing a World War I Centennial Exhibit with an opening reception on Saturday, April 29, at 1:00 pm, in our Grand Staas Gallery. All are welcome. Admission is free, and light refreshments will be served. Curated by Richard F. Welch, Over Here, Over There: Long Island & the Great War will feature artifacts, maps, photographs, weaponry, posters, and more depicting Long Islanders’ experiences during the war . . . from the front lines to the home front, neutrality to belligerence, and mobilization to victory.

unnamed-199

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: April 1, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Granny Road, Farmingville to Yaphank

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed

Granny Road (From the 1909 Belcher Hyde Map Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

Granny Road is a very old road that runs from Farmingville to Yaphank. Have you ever wondered why it’s called Granny Road?

According to local lore, the road is named after Esther Dickinson Penny, known as “Granny Penny.” She was a midwife or doctress, delivering babies, fixing broken bones, and making her own medicines. It was a common sight to see Granny Penny in a red cloak riding a white horse down the road to help a neighbor, or so the legend goes:

Let’s just imagine you were walking along the road that led from Farmingville to the fuller’s mill at Yaphank in 1799, and you heard the clatter of hoofs behind you. Then you saw a white horse go thundering by, urged on by a woman in a red camelot coat. You would know, as you do today when the fire siren stops you short, that there had been an accident and Granny was rushing to the scene of it. 

Born in circa 1735, Esther first married a Mr. Case, who reportedly just “disappeared”; she then married Jonah Halsey of Southold and had two children, Jonah Jr. and Phoebe. Sometime after her second husband died, Granny married a Penny. Years later, a widow for the third time, Granny went to live at her daughter’s home in Wading River (Pheobe had married Jonah Hulse). Granny Penny remained there, at the old Hulse house, until 1837, when she died at the age of 103.

Suggested Reading: “The Granny Road,” Long Island Forum, 1971.

—————————————

The Suffolk County Historical Society is in search of photographs and other memorabilia of Babe Ruth’s historic baseball game at the Riverhead Fairgrounds. Please call 631-727-2881 x100 if you can help!

Read about the game here.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 25, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Babe Ruth in Riverhead, November 9, 1923

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-182

Babe Ruth Plays Baseball at Riverhead Fairgrounds, November 1923. (From the Newspaper Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

As reported in the Riverhead News and County Review in November 1923, George Herman “Babe” Ruth, along with Jack Scott of World Series fame and a selection of All-Star players, defeated the Suffolk All-Stars 5 to 3 at a baseball game held at the Riverhead Fairgrounds on the afternoon of Friday, November 9, 1923. Babe Ruth lived up to his reputation as the “King of Swat,” slamming a home run in the first inning. The ball traveled over the grandstand and bounced back onto the racetrack. As Babe trotted around the bases with a long-distance stride, the crowd went wild with joy. Many of the fans in attendance had never before seen Babe Ruth play a baseball game.

Jack Scott of the Giants pitched a “clever” game through the nine innings. He was opposed on the mound by Suffolk All-Star Harold Goldsmith, who pitched seven innings before being replaced by Jack Conroy of Huntington. Other Suffolk All-Star players included Leo Mitchell, the only Riverhead player on the team; Johnny Brush of Huntington; Al Salmon of Southold; Joe Cassidy and Ray Heany of Greenport; and Walgo of Mattituck, the “Home Run King” of the Eastern Long Island League. Walgo made two extraordinary catches of Babe Ruth’s drives into the outer field.

Upon his arrival at the Fairgrounds, Babe Ruth received a great ovation from the crowd, who surrounded his big Packard. His visit was considered such an important event that all school classes in Riverhead were dismissed to allow students and teachers to attend the game.

The Suffolk County Historical Society is in search of photographs and other memorabilia of Babe Ruth’s historic baseball game at the Riverhead Fairgrounds. Please call 631-727-2881 x100 if you can help!

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 18, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

New York Suffrage Amendment 1

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-178

New York Suffrage Vote Totals in Suffolk County, November 6, 2017

. (From the Newspaper Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives.)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Suffrage (noun): the right to vote in political elections. 

In 1917, after seven decades of New York women and their male allies fighting the suffrage battle, a referendum was put up for a vote in New York state. The legislatively referred constitutional amendment was known as New York Suffrage Amendment 1 or Proposed Amendment 1. The vote took place on November 6, 1917, and was approved by male voters by a margin of 53.92% to 46.08% statewide.

In Suffolk County, Riverhead and Shelter Island were the only towns to cast majority votes against the suffrage, amendment, while the other eight towns–Southold, East Hampton, Southampton, Brookhaven, Islip, Smithtown, Huntington, and Babylon–all voted in favor of granting New York women the right to vote. Three more years would pass before the nation followed suit in 1920.

unnamed-179

100 Years: Votes for New York Women, a Centennial Exhibit Celebrating Long Island Women’s Role in New York’s 1917 Suffrage VictoryOn display March 11 to end of year. Curated by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell. Gallery Hours: Weds. – Sat., 10:00 am – 4:30 pm.  When New York State women won the right to vote one hundred years ago—making 2017 the centennial of that historic civil rights victory—their success changed the national political landscape and was a critical tipping point on the road to a constitutional amendment. Our “History in the Hall” exhibit celebrates the centennial by narrating the stories of Long Island women activists who dedicated themselves to the powerful grassroots movement.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 11, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Elisabeth Freeman, Kings Park

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-169

Elisabeth Freeman (1876-1942) of Kings Park (upper left photo, and with Rosalie Jones). (Images courtesy of the Library of Congress).

Elisabeth Freeman, born in England, came to the United States as a child with her brother, sister, and mother, Mary Hall Freeman, who was estranged from her husband. Mary worked at St. Johnland, an orphanage located in Kings Park, and the children lived there for some time. Elisabeth’s family was not wealthy, and she did not attend college. But during a chance encounter with the British suffragettes on a trip to England, Elisabeth Freeman’s career as a professional speaker and organizer for the American women’s rights movement was born.

She worked with many suffrage organizations–the NYS Woman’s Suffrage Assn., the Women’s Political Union, the National Woman’s Suffrage Assn., The Woman’s Journal, the Texas Woman’s Suffrage Assn., the Congressional Union, and the NYC Woman Suffrage Party. In 1912, Freeman toured Long Island and Ohio with Cold Spring Harbor’s “General” Rosalie Gardiner Jones (left) in a horse-drawn wagon, speaking and organizing for woman’s suffrage.

Freeman was also the official speaker on the 1913 Long Island “Pilgrim’s Hike,” a March to Washington to deliver the suffrage message to President Woodrow Wilson.

Interestingly, Elisabeth Freeman has the notable distinction of being named in a 1919 U.S. Senate Who’s Who in Pacifist and Radical Movements, which included the names of only 50 individuals and organizations, including clergymen, professors, lawyers, writers, Socialists, labor leaders, architects, and a former New York newspaper publisher.

Suggested Readings: Long Island and the Woman Suffrage Movement by Antonia Petrash; Women in Long Island’s Past by Natalie Naylor; and Long Island Women Activists and Innovators, edited by Natalie Naylor and Maureen Murphy.

unnamed-168

100 Years: Votes for New York Women, a Centennial Exhibit Celebrating Long Island Women’s Role in New York’s 1917 Suffrage VictoryOn display March 11 to end of year. Curated by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell. Gallery Hours: Weds. – Sat., 10:00 am – 4:30 pm.  When New York State women won the right to vote one hundred years ago—making 2017 the centennial of that historic civil rights victory—their success changed the national political landscape and was a critical tipping point on the road to a constitutional amendment. Our “History in the Hall” exhibit celebrates the centennial by narrating the stories of Long Island women activists who dedicated themselves to the powerful grassroots movement.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 4, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Mary Louise Booth, Yaphank

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-1

Mary Louise Booth (1831-1889) of Yaphank was an accomplished writer and translator who was most well-known for her anti-slavery work, but she was also strongly involved in the early suffrage movement. Descended on her father’s side from John Booth, who came to America about 1649, Mary was born in Millville (present-day Yaphank) as the eldest of four children to Nancy Monsell and William Chatfield Booth. Her father owned and operated a wooden mill and dye house in Yaphank, and in the winter he served as schoolmaster for the children of Yaphank.

Booth was a child prodigy. She was reading at the age of two, and reading classic literature before age five. She was fluent in both English and French (her mother’s family had fled France during the French Revolution), and she taught herself German, Italian, and Spanish. She taught school for a time, as her father believed teaching was the only suitable career for a woman, but Mary aspired to a literary career. She left home and moved to Manhattan, where she wrote articles for various literary magazines and landed her first paying job as a writer, for the New York Times.

Gaining national attention and recognition for her translations of French anti-slavery books during the Civil War, including a personal thank-you from President Lincoln for her role in supporting the Union cause, Mary Louise Booth also published books, including her History of the City of New York (1859), and served as Harper’s Bazaar’s first editor, a position she held for over twenty years.

Booth served as a delegate to the New York State Teachers Association Convention in 1857, and it was here that she met Susan B. Anthony and joined the women’s rights movement. After the Civil War, Booth joined the National Woman Suffrage Association. Although Booth was not a militant feminist, she exemplified the modern woman: She was productive and well paid, and her accomplishments found their way into the American consciousness.

Suggested Readings: Long Island and the Woman Suffrage Movement by Antonia Petrash; Women in Long Island’s Past by Natalie Naylor; and Long Island Women Activists and Innovators, edited by Natalie Naylor and Maureen Murphy.

unnamed-2

MARCH IS WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH…Join us on Saturday, March 18 at 1:00 pm for a Book & Bottle talk by Antonia Petrash on Long Island and the Woman Suffrage Movement. Members Free; Non-Members $5. Includes light refreshments, museum admission, and book sale & signing. RSVP: 631-727-2881 x100.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 25, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Fort Salonga

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

[To View Fullerton photo visit SCHS website] Fort Salonga, 1903: Wooded Slope, Trout Stream, and Cows Drinking, by Hal B. Fullerton. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives [149.7.831]. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

The hamlet known today as Fort Salonga was established by way of a deeded property from Sarah Smith, wife of Richard Smith, to her son Daniel in 1695. The deed identified 100 acres at the western part of Smithtown, near the border with Huntington, in an area then named Fresh Pond. Maps from the time period also refer to the area as Middleville, Meadow Glen, or Tredwell’s Neck. In the late 1690s, rumors spread that Captain Kidd’s ship, the Adventure Galley, had been seen off Tredwell’s Neck, and on some old maps one can find a spot marked “Kidd’s Money Hole.” Rumors still exist that a pirate’s treasure may be buried on the beach in Fort Salonga.

During the American Revolution, the British established a fortification at Tredwell’s Neck called Fort Slongo, named after one of the fort’s architects. This name shifted to Fort Salonga sometime in the 1800s.

unnamed-2

Join us on Thurs., March 2, 6:00 pm for a Closing Reception & Curator’s Talk, Fullerton from the Photographer’s Perspective. This is the last chance to view Fullerton’s Long Island, our display of historic photographs of Long Island from our legendary Fullerton Collection. Free admission + wine and cheese. RSVP: 631-727-2881 x100.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 18, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Letter from George Washington, 1795

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-149

Letter from George Washington to Nine Suffolk County Residents Who Had Expressed Opposition to the Jay Treaty of 1795. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

This rare document turned up in the Southold home of Mary Dayton, whose ancestors were among New York state’s first judges. The letter, dated September 7, 1795, was addressed to Ms. Dayton’s great-great-great grandfather, Jared Landon of Cutchogue, and eight other Suffolk County residents who had expressed opposition to the Jay Treaty of 1795: David Hedges of Bridgehampton, Benjamin Huntting of Southampton, Abraham Miller of East Hampton, Benjamin Horton Jr. of Southold, Nicoll Floyd of Mastic, John Howard of Shelter Island, Josiah Reeve of Mattituck, and David Warren of Jamesport. Although we are unsure whether George Washington or a staffer actually penned the letter, it was issued from the president’s office. The letter reads: 

“Gentlemen, I have received your letter of Aug 6 expressing your Sentiments on the Treatly lately negotiated between the United States and Great Britain. It is now generally known that the Treaty has received my Assent on the Condition proposed by the Senate; this was not given until after most mature deliberations. Not withstanding the Diversity of Opinion which has been manifested is much to be regretted, I cannot but hope that experience will show that the public interest required the Course which has been pursued. With due respect, I am Gentlemen, Your Obedient Geo. Washington.”

There was anger over Britain’s refusal to withdraw troops from the northwestern frontier, refusal to enter into commercial agreements, and mistreatment of crews on American ships. President Washington had sent Supreme Court Justice John Jay to negotiate with Britain, and Jay returned with a treaty in which some concessions had been gained, but not nearly as many as the American public had hoped for. The nine Suffolk County residents had sent a letter to Washington expressing doubts about the Jay Treaty that the young United States had recently signed with Great Britain.

Many Long Islanders had been imprisoned or forced to flee to Connecticut during the British occupation, and when they returned, many found that their possessions had been plundered and their homes wrecked by fire or cannonballs. In addition, Washington had been informed that David Hedges had spent seven years in a British lockup in Southampton. The President therefore took special pains to respond personally to these men of Suffolk County.

Suggested Reading: The Diary of George Washington From 1789 to 1791; Embracing the Opening of the First Congress, and His Tours Through New England, Long Island, and the Southern States, 1860.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 4, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882)

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed

Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882):

A Journey from Slave to Abolitionist to U.S. Ambassador

 

My whole life is consecrated to the cause of Liberty.
Wherever my lot shall be cast, I shall feel free
to raise my feeble voice for equal justice.

— Henry Highland Garnet, 1846

Although one of the most well-known African Americans of the nineteenth century, Henry Highland Garnet, sadly, is little remembered today. Even less remembered are his connections to Long Island and Suffolk County. As a young fugitive slave and an outspoken abolitionist, Garnet was given shelter by sympathizers on Long Island for several years. Quakers in Westbury took him in, and later they arranged for him to go farther east and be apprenticed to Epenetus Smith of Smithtown.

Despite his birth into the bondage of slavery, the loss of a limb, and the persistent discrimination and bigotry he faced, Garnet went on to achieve great successes: he was an effective orator and writer, prominent clergyman, educator, and diplomat. He was also one of the first African Americans to be appointed as a U.S. ambassador.

Henry Highland Garnet has the notable distinction of being the first African American to speak at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. On Sunday, February 12, 1865, within days of Congress’s adoption of the 13th Amendment banning slavery, Rev. Garnet delivered a sermon in the Hall of the House of Representatives entitled “Let the Monster Perish” (go here to read it). 

Visit our new Black History Month “History in the Hall” Exhibit to learn much more about the life and accomplishments of Henry Highland Garnet. The exhibit will run to March 3, 2017. Gallery Hours: Wednesday to Saturday, 10:00 am – 4:30 pm.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 4, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Pyrrhus Concer: Slave, Whaler, & Entrepreneur 

from Southampton, 1814-1897

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-141

Pyrrhus Concer: Slave, Whaler, & Entrepreneur from Southampton, 1814-1897. Born a slave in Southampton in 1814, Pyrrhus Concer, as a free man, went whaling at the age of 18. He sailed as a common seaman during his first voyages and then was promoted to boatsteerer, a position of great importance on a whaling ship. The boatsteerer was responsible for guiding the whaleboat toward the targeted whale and for throwing the first harpoon, and then for holding the boat close to the whale while other shipmates killed the whale.

Concer sailed on the famous voyage of the Manhattan in 1848, captained by Mercator Cooper of Southampton, when it picked up several shipwrecked Japanese fishermen in the Pacific Ocean. The Manhattan took those fishermen from Japan home and thus became the first American ship to enter Tokyo Harbor, which at the time was closed to foreign ships. The Japanese were fascinated by Concer, the first person of African heritage they had ever seen, and treated him with curiosity and respect. After retiring from whaling, Concer headed for the goldfields of California for a short time before returning to Southampton, where he operated a ferry service on Lake Agawam.

Concer, who died at the age of 84 in his home at 51 Pond Lane in Southampton Village, left a legacy to the Presbyterian Church of Southampton and a fond memory. His obituary described him as “one of the most respected residents of the village.” The stone that marks the Southampton grave of Pyrrhus Concer bears this inscription:

Though born a slave
he possessed virtues
without which kings
are but slaves.

Though the historic Pyrrhus Concer home was demolished by the current property owners, efforts are under way to reconstruct the historic building. Learn more about this local effort at our February 11 Book & Bottle, Preserving the Legacy of Pyrrhus Concer with Drs. Allison Manfra McGovern and Georgette Grier-Key.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members, and includes light refreshments and admission to current exhibits. The Saturday event begins at 1:00 pm. Please reserve by calling 631-727-2881 x100.

unnamed-140

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: JANUARY 20, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

Edward Daily, Babylon Town Supervisor, 1899 – 1912

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-133

Edward Daily, Babylon Town Supervisor, 1899-1912. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

Edward Daily was a prominent citizen of Babylon, and was born there in 1851. He received his education from private tutors until age 10, when he entered the public school of his native town. As a teenager he first learned the paper-making trade, and then at age 16, having acquired a fondness for horses, he began working at a stable in Islip. Later he was the proprietor of a popular livery stable in Babylon, and in 1875 and 1876, he conducted an undertaking business in connection with his livery establishment.

Mr. Daly was a Democrat who served his party in several county conventions. He was elected to the office of highway commissioner and as overseer of the poor. He was also instrumental in the incorporation of the villege of Babylon, serving as its trustee and president. In 1899 Daily was elected to the office of Babylon Town Supervisor and served in that capacity until his death in 1912.

unnamed-134

An ad from the 1897 Brooklyn and Long Island Business Directory.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

unnamed-135

Join us tomorrow afternoon, Saturday, Jan. 28, 1:00 pm, for the Opening Reception of A Time Portal to the North Fork: Riverhead to Orient Point. The exhibit, featuring photographs of the North Fork by three local photographers, celebrates the agricultural and maritime heritage of the North Fork of Long Island. The photographs are available for sale, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit the Suffolk County Historical Society, Admission is free. Light refreshments will be served.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
___________________________ 
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: JANUARY 20, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

——————————–

East End’s Corn Doctor, 1930s

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-1

Guns and Photo of the East End’s Corn Doctor, 1930s. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.) 

In 1932, “Doc” Frank Tuthill, an eccentric 68-year-old resident of Quogue, mysteriously disappeared. Affectionately known as the “Corn Doctor” (he was a chiropodist or foot doctor), Tuthill was also known as a “walking bank.” During the Great Depression years, he was frequently seen in and around East End hamlets wearing two coats, one over the other, all year round no matter the weather or season. Inside the pockets of his coats he carried with him tens of thousands of dollars in cash because he didn’t trust the banks. He also carried multiple revolvers to protect himself.

On a summer day in August of 1932, Tuthill drove his dilapidated Model T Ford roadster to a Riverhead pharmacy for a soda, and while he was there he was called to the phone and heard to say: “I’ll be there at 10 o’clock this evening!” and hung up. As Tuthill set out for his appointment later that night, he told his rooming house landlord that he had $10,000 in cash and several guns on his person, and if he didn’t return by the next day, the landlord should call the police.

Two weeks later, Tuthill’s bullet-ridden body was found in Hampton Bays, with the pockets of his coats turned inside out and his money stolen. Area residents Victor Downs and his wife Mitzie were accused of robbing and murdering Tuthill. Though sensational trials ensued in the Riverhead courts, no one was ever effectively prosecuted for his murder.

Shown here are the Corn Doctor’s British Bulldog revolvers alongside a photo of Frank Tuthill, Donated to the Suffolk County Historical Society in 1951, these two guns were among several that Tuthill always carried with him, the larger one being his favorite for many years.

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
___________________________ 

 

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: JANUARY 14, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

——————————–

Instructions for Census Agents, Albany, 1917

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed-121

Instructions for Census Agents, Albany, 1917. (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.) 

This 24-page instruction booklet was used by New York State military census takers in the spring of 1917 as the country was entering the world war. We believe our copy was owned by a census taker in Smithtown. Governor Charles S. Whitman ordered and directed that the census be taken. As the booklet explains…

“The Military Census consists primarily of the securing of certain information from the men and women of the State between the ages of 16 and 50 years, inclusive, in the form of answers to questions…approved by the Governor and issued through the office of the Adjutant General of the State. The reason for taking the Military Census at this time is that modern warfare demands, if the maximum strength of a nation is to be exerted, that the population shall be completely mobilized for war…. This consideration applies equally to men and women. It is hoped and expected that the present war will not necessitate any marked interference with the industrial organization of the State, nor require any widespread transplanting of the population, but it is deemed essential that the information should be secured at once so that if it should prove necessary to use it, it would be available without loss of time. This is indispensable to a proper distribution of the burden imposed by war.”

Sample Military Census questions: How old are you? What is your full name? In what city, town, or village do you live? Were you born in the United States? Are you white or colored? Are you a citizen of the United States? By birth or naturalization? Are you married? How many persons are dependent upon you for their entire support? In what industry or business are you engaged? Have you a trade or profession? Have you ever been employed in shipbuilding? For what particular arm of the military service do you believe yourself to be best fitted?

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
___________________________ 

 

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: JANUARY 7, 2017 — FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES
“How shall we know it is us without our past?” – John Steinbeck

——————————–

Riverhead Snow, 1920

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Librarian 

unnamed

Riverhead Snow, 1920. (Image from the Hattie Aldrich Collection of the Suffolk County Historical 
Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.) 

With the snowstorm approaching, we pulled this photograph from the early twentieth century of a snowy winter scene. Probably members of the Aldrich family, three adults, one child, and a dog are shown sitting on top of a snow bank following a snowstorm in Riverhead in March of 1920.

We will be closing at noon today [Saturday, January 7, 2017] due to the snow. Stay safe, and have a wonderful weekend! 

************************************************************

SCHS Photo of the Week: Click Here to Visit Webpage.
Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To view 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To view 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

_____________________________________________________________________

Find more like this: Archive, Columns, Contents, Issue 1 Archive, Issue 1 Columns

Comments are closed.

Back | Home