2.15/ Long Island Natural History Conference — Brookhaven National Lab, 3.24/25


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LONG ISLAND NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE

Friday and Saturday, March 24-25, 2017
at Brookhaven National Laboratory

 

Registration Now Open

TOPICS & PRESENTERS

 

Horseshoe Crabs: Global Conservation Icon in Dire Straits.

John T. Tanacredi, Ph.D., Dept. of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Studies, and Director of CERCOM, Molloy College

              

Freshwater Fishes of Long Island: What are they and where did they come from?

Chart Guthrie, Regional Fisheries Manager, NYSDEC, Stony Brook.

 

Restoring Tributaries and River Herring on Long Island

Enrico Nardone, Esq., Executive Director, Seatuck Environmenal Association

                                                     

Herpetofauna of the Northeast Coastal Region

Alvin Breisch, Roosevelt Wild Life Station, College of Environmental Science & Forestry, Syracuse

 

What’s so special about the Long Island Dwarf Pine Plains?

Jessica Gurevitch, Ph.D., Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University

 

The American beachgrass microbiome: spying on private conversations underground.

Javier A. Izquierdo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Hofstra University

 

Plankton blooms, decreasing temperatures and recent fishkills: is there a connection? 

Sixto Portilla, The Graduate Center, CUNY

 

What Every Naturalist Should Know About the Geologic History and Glacial
Geomorphology of Long Island

Dr. J Bret Bennington, Dept. of Geology, Environment, and Sustainability, Hofstra

 

From Plankton to Whales: Why our local waters are worth protecting.

Christopher Paparo, Marine Sciences Center Manager, Stony Brook University

                                                     

Bluefin Tuna Ecology and Management

Bradley S. McHale, Northeast Branch Chief, National Marine Fisheries Service

 

Wicked Neat; the Natural History of Vernal Pools.

Matthew R. Burne, Conservation Director, Walden Woods Project

 

Long Island’s Role in the Comeback of the Great White Shark.

Tobey H. Curtis, NOAA – National Marine Fisheries Service and UMASS– Dartmouth

 

Salt Marshes: A Natural and Unnatural History

Judith S. Weis, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University

 

Plum Island: Biological Linchpin of an Archipelago

Louise Harrison, New York Outreach Coordinator, Plum Island Campaign, Save the Sound

 

To register or for more information visit their website Long Island Nature.

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